200 West 57th Street, Suite 1101
New York, NY 10019
212-810-2828

 

Facts & Figures

Medications

Injectable medications used in the egg freezing process

Which injection medications you’ll probably be using:

  • Gonal-F or Follistim (follicle stimulating hormone), used to stimulate egg production
  • Menopur, a combination hormonal medication (follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone), also used to stimulate egg production
  • Ganirelix Acetate or Cetrotide, medications used to prevent premature release of the eggs before you’re ready for your egg retrieval procedure
  • Lupron (also known as leuprolide acetate), a type of “trigger” medication used to initiate the final egg maturation before the retrieval and freezing
  • hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin), also sold as Ovidrel or Novarel, an alternative kind of “trigger” medication

What to do about insurance:

Extend Fertility doesn’t accept health insurance. However, if your health plan covers egg freezing services, we’ll provide you with the documentation you’ll need to submit a claim to your insurance company.

Your medications are ordered through a pharmacy, which will bill you separately (Click here for a list of pharmacies that carry egg freezing medications). Follow these steps below to understand if your health insurance plan will cover the medications above.

For everyone:

Contact your insurance company to ask if your specific plan requires prior authorization for certain types of high-cost medications.

If your health plan does require prior authorization, follow the steps outlined in Option A, below. If your plan does not require prior authorization, follow the steps outlined in Option B, below.

Option A: If your plan does require prior authorization

  1. Ask the health plan representative if your specific plan covers elective egg freezing (alternative names your health plan may use: oocyte preservation or cryopreservation).
  2. If your health plan does cover elective egg freezing, that’s great! You have what you need from your health plan. Advise your healthcare team at Extend Fertility and we’ll work on your behalf to secure your prior authorization.
  3. Unfortunately, if your health plan requires prior authorization but does not cover elective egg freezing, your medication costs will not be covered by your insurance.

Option B: If your plan does NOT require prior authorization

  1. Ask the health plan representative to check if the list of medications above is covered by your plan. If all or some of them are covered, ask your health plan representative if there’s a specific pharmacy you will need to use to order the medications. Then, share that information with us.

Once you have obtained that information, contact our healthcare team at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) so we may assist you in properly ordering your medication. And if you have any questions, or any difficulty navigating this issue, please let us know. We’ll do everything we can to help.


FAQs

We understand you might have a lot of questions. That’s a good thing! We’ve collected a few of the most frequently asked questions for reference here, but if there’s something we haven’t covered, the healthcare team is just a phone call away.

See the FAQs.

Studies Say

Cryopreservation, fertility preservation, and egg freezing have been researched by physicians and other experts for decades. This list includes some of the most enlightening and important studies published in the field of reproductive medicine.

See the studies.

Glossary

We try to keep things simple, but sometimes, we have to use medical lingo to be as accurate as possible. This glossary is here as a reference, just in case we ever use a phrase that’s not familiar to you.

See the glossary.

Forms & Resources

Current and prospective patients can find paperwork and resources for medication, insurance, and more here.

See forms & resources.

Fertility Statistics by Age

If you’ve heard it once, you’ve heard it a thousand times—age is the most important factor in fertility. But what does that really mean?

Learn more.


×